Prof. PAN Xingming-History ofChina's Foreign Relations-Syllabus

East China Normal University

 

 

Course name:           History of China’s Foreign Relations

Course number(s):        

Language of instruction:      English

Term:                             Fall 2015

Credits:                               3

Contact Hours:               36

Course meeting times:         Thursdays 14:00-17:00 

Course meeting place:   Room 404, Science Building A, Zhongbei Campus

Professor:                 Pan Xingming, Professor

Contact Information:      Email: panxm2011@126.com

Office address:        Room 407, Science Building A, Zhongbei Campus

Office hours:                   Thursdays 17:00-18:00

 

Course Description

This course designed to enable students to master the fundamental system of knowledge about the history of China’s foreign relations, the research methods and capabilities, through reading, discussing, presenting and writing papers. Course is to explore the history of China's relations with major countries, especially the history of the major issues in its foreign relations. Reading materials may not represent the views of the instructor, and due to the  insufficiency of the books and other materials in English written by Chinese scholars, only those by foreign scholars are listed.  

 

Learning Objectives

The students are expected to master the fundamental system of knowledge about the history of China’s foreign relations, the relevant research methods and capabilities.

 

Course Prerequisites

The following books are required to read before attending the course:

John King Fairbank, China : tradition & transformation, Allen & Unwin, 1979. From Ch. 10.

Alan Lawrance , China's foreign relations since 1949 ,  Routledge & K. Paul, 1975.

 

Robert G. Sutter, Foreign relations of the PRC : the legacies and constraints of China's international politics since 1949, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013.

 

Methods of Instruction

 

The course will be taught in the form of seminars, including lectures, presentation by students and class debates and so on.

 

Assessment and Final Grade

In this course, grading will be based on the following:

               

            70% Paper

        30% Classroom engagement (presentation, attendance, attention, participation in discussions)

 

Students are required to attend every class. Occasionally, due to illness or other unavoidable circumstance, a student may need to miss a class.  ECNU policy requires a medical certificate to be excused. Any absence may impact on the student's grade. Moreover, ECNU policy is that a student who has more than 4 unexcused absences will fail the course.

 

Course Requirements

 

        Students are expected to:

 

  • Attend all classes and be responsible for all material covered in class and otherwise assigned. Any unexcused absence may impact a student's grade. Moreover,  ECNU policy is that a student who has more than 4 unexcused absence will fail the course
  • Complete the day’s required reading and assignments before class
  • Refrain from texting, phoning or engaging in computer activities unrelated to class during class
  • Participate in class discussions and complete required written work on time

 

Weekly Schedule

        The planned schedule sketched out below may be modified to suit the interests or abilities of the enrolled students or to take advantage of special opportunities or events that may arise during the term.

 

Week One         

9/8    Orientation

 

WEEK  Two and Three(9/17, 9/24):

 

Introduction:    Chinese Pre-Modern world Concept and Order: Tributary System                                               

Read:

J. K. Fairbank, S. Y. Têng, "On The Ch'ing Tributary System", Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 6, No. 2 (Jun., 1941), pp. 135-246 .

Brantly Womack, "Asymmetry and China's Tributary System", The Chinese Journal of International Politics, Vol. 5, 2012, 37–54.

 

 

WEEK  Four and Five(10/8, 10/15):

 

China’s Foreign  Relations 1840-1949

 

Read:

John King Fairbank, China : tradition & transformation, Allen & Unwin, 1979. From Ch. 10-13, mainly those sections concerning foreign affairs.

 

 

WEEK  Six and Seven(10/22, 10/29):

 

China’s Foreign  Relations 1949-1980s

 

Read:

Robert G. Sutter, Foreign relations of the PRC : the legacies and constraints of China's international politics since 1949, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013.

Chapter 1: Assessing China’s Role in World Affairs

Chapter 2: Mao’s Changing Course in Foreign Affairs, 1949–1969

Chapter 3: Maneuvering Between the United States and USSR, 1969–1989

 

 

 

WEEK  Eight and Nine(11/5, 11/12):

 

Relations with the United States

 

Read:

Robert G. Sutter, Foreign relations of the PRC : the legacies and constraints of China's international politics since 1949, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013.

Chapter 7: Relations with the United States

 

 

WEEK Ten (11/19):

Relations with Russia (Soviet Union) ()

 

Read:

 David J. Rogerson, China and Russia : competition and partnership, New York: Nova Science Publishers, c2010.

 

 

Week Eleven (11/20 )

Guest Speaker: Flint Colin, Adjunct Professor, Department of Political Science, Utah State University,

The One Belt, One Road Project Through the Lens of the Modern Geopolitical Imagination: How the West Interprets China’s Foreign Policy

Time and venue: TBA

 

 

WEEK Twelve ( 11/27 )

  Field trip, no class

 

 

 

WEEK Thirteen (12/3):

Relations with Russia (Soviet Union) ()

 

Read:

 David J. Rogerson, China and Russia : competition and partnership, New York: Nova Science Publishers, c2010.

 

 

WEEK Fourteen (12/10):

 

Relations with Japan, Koreas, Vietnam , India and Other Asian Countries

 

Read:

Robert G. Sutter, Foreign relations of the PRC : the legacies and constraints of China's international politics since 1949, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013.

Chapter 8: Relations with Neighboring Asian Countries

 

 

WEEK Fifteen (12/17)

Relations with European, African and Latin American Countries

 

 

Conclusion  (12/31)

 

 

Read:

Robert G. Sutter, Foreign relations of the PRC : the legacies and constraints of China's international politics since 1949, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013.

Chapter 9: Relations beyond Nearby Asia

Chapter 10: Implications and Outlook

 

Academic Honesty

Students are expected to maintain high standards of academic honesty. Specifically, unless otherwise directed by the professor, students may not consult other students, books, notes, electronic devices or any other source, on examinations. Failure to abide by this may result in a zero on the examination, or even failure in the course.

 

Students are also expected to adhere to appropriate scholarly conventions in essays and research papers. This class includes paper assignment(s) in which students must give credit to all outside sources used by means of citations and a bibliography. Failure to do so may result in a zero on the paper assignment, or even failure in the course.

 

 

Instructor:

Name: PAN Xingming

Title: Professor, Director of the Center for European Studies, ECNU

Education: PhD, Nanjing University

Specialties: History of the British Empire and Commonwealth, China-EU Relations, China’s Foreign Relations

 

本文最后更新时间: 2015-11-05 12:39:00         阅读次数: 8683

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